Answers to Common Questions

Question:

"Why would I want to use a broker to sell my plane when I can sell it myself?"

Answer:

"You can, and in some instances you should.  Selling yourself (FSBO - For Sale by Owner) isn't for everyone though and always comes at a cost.  Watch this short video to learn more:"

 

Question:

"What types of airplanes do you specialize in?"

Answer:

"Our focus is very narrow.  We have found that brokers who accept any aircraft into their inventory do a disservice to their clientele.  Furthermore, we restrict ourselves to the number of listings we will accept each month as well as the total number of listings we will maintain at any given time.  Rather than trying to be everything to everyone, WildBlue is a boutique aircraft brokerage that is obsessed with giving each client the absolute best personal service for the most reasonable price possible.  We search out pristine, late-model (typically 1984 and later), single-pilot piston singles, twins, turboprops, and the occasional light jet, typically valued at over $100,000.  We love working with the Beechcraft Bonanza and Baron; Piper Saratoga, M-Class line (Malibu, Mirage, Matrix, Meridian), and Seneca; the Cessna 172 Skyhawk, 182 Skylane, 206 Stationair, 208 Caravan, and the 300/350/400 Columbia/Corvalis; the Cirrus SR20 & SR22; and the Diamond DA40 and DA42. "

Question:

"Do you represent experimental aircraft?"

Answer:

"No, we do not."

Question:

"My plane has damage history.  Will you consider representing it?"

Answer:

"As you've probably found, the classification of damage history can be a very subjective thing.  One person's 'major damage' is another's 'fixed better than new.'  The quality of the repair work -- and reputation of the shop -- can vary considerably.  That's why we look at each airplane on a case-by-case basis.  Our litmus test for accepting aircraft with previous damage history consists of 4 parts.  1)  Was it repaired (and extensively documented) by a top-tier repair facility?; 2) Is this an isolated damage event?; 3) Will a new owner be able to sell the airplane in a reasonable time frame and for a reasonable amount?; and 4) Would we feel comfortable owning the airplane and putting our own families in it?   Unless we can answer 'yes' to all 4 questions, we will be more than happy to recommend you to another aircraft broker or dealer."

Question:

"Why don't you use a numbered rating scale to describe the condition of the interior and exterior?"

Answer:

"We used to...but found that no matter how well intentioned, such a scale is very subjective at best.  We found that our rating typically pleased neither party.  If we rated the interior an "8", the seller -- as often as not -- would say it was at least a "9" while buyer's would argue for a "7".  Our intent is to give you as much fact based information as possible so you can make that decision on your own."

Question:

"How much do you charge?"

Answer:

"We utilize a tiered commission schedule which means that the more your airplane is worth the less our commission percentage will be.  Since we are obsessed with reducing those costs that don't directly benefit you we have found our fees to be extremely competitive.  Please call us at 888.773.4249 to discuss your specific aircraft and situation."

Question:

"I've heard most brokers never physically see the airplane they're representing.  Have you seen the planes you list?"

Answer:

"Absolutely.  We don't see how you can accurately represent a plane and it's owner otherwise.  We travel to see each and every airplane listed, at our cost, without exception."

Question:

"I'm thinking about listing my plane.  Do I have to bring it to your location?"

Answer:

"No.  While we have that ability it is not necessary for us to inventory your airplane while it is being sold.  If you're still flying the plane then we can easily accommodate you by coming to your location to evaluate the aircraft.  However, in some instances it may be advantageous for us to have the plane in Kansas City.  For example, if you're not flying it much, you have a hangar lease about to expire, or you don't have the time to show the plane, you might give serious thought to bringing the aircraft to our location."

Question:

"I want to sell my airplane with WildBlue.  Do you guarantee my satisfaction?"

Answer:

"We sure do.  In fact, we promise to outwork anyone in this business.  If you're not completely satisfied, let us know and we'll modify our fee as necessary.

Question:

"What things should my mechanic look at during the pre-purchase inspection?"

Answer:

"First and foremost, the shop should review the logs for completeness, accuracy of all reported times (airframe, engine, prop, etc), compliance with all airworthiness directives, and erroneous or missing information.  Once your mechanic is satisfied with the logs the physical inspection should begin.  Most mechanics have thorough checklists that they like to use (if not, join a type-club and request their checklist).  Some maintenance facilities will only perform an annual inspection.  Once the inspection is complete and you are satisfied with the results most sales contracts stipulate that you are purchasing the aircraft 'as is.'  Therefore, the length and depth of the inspection should be such that you will feel confident continuing with the purchase of the airplane."