Of course, the answer to the question in the headline is “Good Customer.”  Easy enough right?

Wrong.

Why?  Because far too many people demand good customer service without actually being a good customer.  They are rude, arrogant, condescending, and boorish.  They are entitlement minded.  They’ve conned themselves into believing that they actually deserve good customer service without having to give anything in return.  They’ve become that person you’re embarrassed to go out to eat with.

How did we forget basic civility in this country in such a short period of time?  Why is it we think we are special, that we know more than previous generations, and that our expectations are justified?

Don’t agree with me?  Take a look around the next time you’re at a restaurant and watch how patrons treat the wait staff.  Think about how you’ve treated a vendor whom you’ve never met in person.  (Anonymity can easily foster this type of behavior – social media diatribes are a case in point).  Watch how the gate agent is treated the next time you’re at the airport.   I’m not talking everyone here, but it probably won’t take you too long to find someone who fits this description.  Heck, I find myself guilty of such actions from time to time.  We all do.  But enough is enough.

My intent here is not to get into what’s happened to our societal norms, values, and behavior.  What I want to do is to help each of us see where we fit into this equation and what we’re each doing to foster this unhealthy environment.  And it starts with expectations.  Who told you things were going to be perfect all day long?  Did someone, somewhere, whisper in your ear that you have a right to demand perfection from others yet expect grace when it comes your own shortcomings?  I’ll bet your mom didn’t teach that you shouldn’t ever have to wait.  Nor did your dad tell you things wouldn’t go wrong.  If they were good parents they probably told you things like “get over it”, “suck it up”, or “treat others the way you want to be treated.” 

Just to set the record straight, I’m certainly not writing this article based on experiences with my customers.  I’ve got a very deep respect with those who do business with me and vastly appreciate their perspective and experience.  And, almost without exception, I’ve found them to reciprocate on every level.  I like to think that folks in my industry are a notch above others, but I may be slightly biased.  My comments are however based on casual observations from daily life.  Traveling.  Going to the movie.  Eating out.  Waiting in lines at the airport. 

May I encourage you then, the next time you’re faced with a less-than-perfect customer experience, to put on your best face, lift up those who are serving you, and get out of the paradigm that you’re owed something and are not getting it.  In other words, get over yourself, roll with the punches, and appreciate the efforts of others.  Do that, and I’ll bet you’ll notice an improvement in the customer service you receive.  

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